2017-09-14 / News

‘Run like a Wildebeest’ funds used for scholarships, track equipment, local charities

By Sam Tunningley


Greg Flint, middle, poses for a picture with his daughter, Talia, and his youngest son, Elijah. Flint passed away in 2011 and is the inspiration for Flushing’s Run like a Wildebeest race. 
Photo donated by the Flint family. Greg Flint, middle, poses for a picture with his daughter, Talia, and his youngest son, Elijah. Flint passed away in 2011 and is the inspiration for Flushing’s Run like a Wildebeest race. Photo donated by the Flint family. Run like a Wildebeest, now in its sixth year, has become one of the premier races in Flushing thanks to the hard work of Lora Gutierrez Flint and a dedicated group of friends ensuring the memory of her husband, Greg Flint, and his dedication to fitness stays alive.

The race has become known for its sizable donations back into the community, placing an emphasis on kids, Christian charities and track and cross country teams. Always held on the last Saturday in April, the event has raised around $72,000 since beginning.

This year, the group raised $10,000, with $5,000 reserved for Flushing High School scholarships and $3,000 for equipment and invite fee costs for the track and cross country teams. The remaining

$2,000 was donated to the Flushing Community Church and the Flushing Christian Outreach Center.

Kirk May, a friend of Greg Flint and a key organizer of the race, said the track and cross country teams have a great need for money to cover travel costs.

“We simply hand them a check, and we know the money is being spent wisely,” said May.

Flint said the scholarships are based on a strong balance of athleticism and academics, and require an application. Five were handed out this year at the honors ceremony.

She has also directed donations in the past to the Thomas Smith Memorial Foundation and the Riverview Trail.

She added it has become something more than a race to honor Greg, who was 48 years old when he died of a heart attack; it’s also meant to commend the community he loved.

“We’re just really overwhelmed from all the help provided by the city,” said Flint. “For me, personally, it belongs to everyone.”

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